I went to Vulcano island to experience yet another volcano hike, and discovered a place that has so much more to offer than I ever expected.

When I finally arrive in Vulcano island, after more than 12 hours of traveling from Spain, the night has fallen already. I have heard the island (one of the seven of the Aeolian Islands archipelago, and the closest one to Milazzo, in Sicily) is beautiful. But I can’t confirm this, right now: it’s so dark that I can’t see a thing.

I have also heard that Vulcano island has a strong smell of sulphur. This, I am immediately able to confirm, on the other hand. The air does smell like rotten eggs. I wonder if I’ll get used to it.

The acrid smell of sulphur is only one of the many things that will remind you there’s a reason why Vulcano island has that name. It’s the same smell I sensed on other volcanoes, such as Masaya in Nicaragua, or Mount Bromo in Indonesia. Volcanic activity here has been going on since 120000 years. There are craters and calderas all over. It’s what prompted me to visit.

In this post, I share a few facts about the island of Volcano and some tips on how to make the most of it.

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Vulcanello peninsula can be seen from the Gran Cratere of Vulcano

A Guide To The Things To Do Vulcano Island, Sicily

Take in the incredible views

The first thing you need to do when in Volcano island is taking in the splendid views. If you have a chance, a stay at Therasia Resort is a guarantee of a stunning view. I stayed there and every morning marveled at the sight that spread in front of my eyes. The light is magic at that time of day. You will get to see Lipari, the biggest of the Aeolian Islands. In the distance, you’ll see Alicudi, Filicudi, Salina and Stromboli – one of the most fun islands to visit.

Read about my adventure in Stromboli on my post “Why Mount Stromboli is the best volcano hike.”

If you look at your back from Therasia, you will be able to see the base of a volcano. That is Vulcanello and it is one of the many volcanoes on Vulcano island.

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The mud of Vulcano island is said to have beneficial properties

Explore the villages 

I visited Vulcano at the end of October. By then, the buzz of the summer months is gone, and with it the crowds of tourists. Most businesses close at the end of October and only the roughly 500 people that live in Vulcano throughout the year will remain. The small villages are lovely to explore, and with them the surroundings. While tourism remains the first revenue for Vulcano, there are a lot of vineyards and olive groves.

Enjoy the beaches

Whether you visit Vulcano during the spring, summer or early fall, make sure to visit the beaches. There are two beaches on each side of the isthmus that connects the main island to a smaller one known as Vulcanello. Both beaches are characterized by dark, volcanic sand. It’s so different from the white beaches of Sardinia I am used to, or from the incredibly turquoise waters of the Maldives you may be thinking of. Yet the sea is incredibly transparent.

Go to the mud baths

Vulcano is famous for the mud baths and to be fair you don’t want to miss them. They are said to have incredibly beneficial properties – for example they cure asthma, which I suffer from. It is only €3 to get in, but the sulphur smell is overpowering. Be prepared for that.

Climb the faraglioni

Right where the mud baths are located, there are the beautiful “faraglioni,” the rock stacks from which you can get a good view of the bay. Keep in mind that it is not officially permitted to walk up (though there is a trail) as apparently people jump over the fence and fall, which leads to a call for rescue. It took me some convincing to the guard at the entrance. You may give it a try, but don’t say I told you so!

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The clear waters and the “acque calde” of Vulcano are inviting for a swim, even in the fall

Swim in the acque calde

One of the unmissable things to do in Vulcano island is swimming in its famous “acque calde” (warm waters). Tens of submarine volcanic fumaroles eject hot steam, giving the water the effect of a natural jacuzzi. If you aren’t a fan of the cold waters of the Mediterranean, this transparent stretch of sea will be the perfect spot for a swim!

Have a granita

Much like the rest of Sicily, Vulcano is a perfect place to have a granita. There are a few coffee shops where you can pop in to get one. I like the one right in front of the harbour because the views are lovely. It’s a nice way to relax and indulge a bit before continuing exploring the island.

Go for a hike

With so many volcanoes, it is only obvious that one of the best things to do in Vulcano island is hiking.

The hike to the Gran Cratere is meant to be a sweet, easy hike, yet rewarding. Most people hike it independently, but if you want to get some facts right about the island and its volcanoes, I recommend hiring a guide (besides, I am not a fan of hiking alone – and here’s why).

A hiking tour of Vulcano typically stops at Vulcanello, located on the north of Vulcano. This used to be a separate island, formed with an eruption in 183 BC, which through a series of eruptions, was eventually joined to Vulcano via a small isthmus by 1550 AC.

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The view of Lipari from the caldera of Vulcanello

Vulcanello was the youngest vulcano of the island, and the one with the shortest life too. It’s fairly easy to reach once the guide points the trail, which is well hidden in the vegetation. There’s a very large caldera – a volcanic depression that was formed after a violent volcanic eruption, when the cone of a volcano collapses in the space left after the magma is expelled.

The second stop during the hike is Valle dei Mostri (Monster Valley), located in Vulcanello. This looks almost like a natural amphitheater, with statues all around – which actually are the result of the erosion of the lava rock by the sea and the wind. They look like monsters – hence the name of the place.

Nowadays, only a few remain. With time, many have been completely eroded. Others have been taken away by the owners of local villas to place them in their gardens. I am still baffles as to why the local authorities have allowed this to happen.

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The eroded lava stone took the shape of a dinosaur

The final stop will be Gran Cratere. Most people start hiking in the late afternoon, and while during the fall the temperatures will be pleasant (especially if you get a nice marine breeze), this is not a hike you should underestimate on warmer days.

The view during the hike is so beautiful that you’ll often stop for photos. From the top, you can see all of the Aeolian Islands archipelago – Lipari and Salina, really close; Alicudi, Filicudi, Stromboli and Panarea in the distance. On a very clear day it is also possible to see the northern coast of Sicily and Etna.

It takes less than one hour to reach the main crater, known as Caldera de La Fossa. The caldera is huge, with a 500 meters diameter. The last eruption here occurred in 1890, but there are plenty of fumaroles that eject steam. It isn’t possible to get inside the crater, because the concentration of gas that is accumulated in the depression makes the air almost impossible to breathe.

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A splendid view of the Aeolian Islands during the Gran Cratere hike

The fumaroles are mostly composed of sulphur, which gives the terrain its red and yellow color, and which fills the air of the typical acre stench. The best way to overcome the smell is to walk through the fumaroles wearing a mask (make sure to carry one). Even with that protection, the smell is nauseating.

Once at the top, the views are even better. You can see the port of Levante, where all boats dock, and Vulcanello and the Aeolian Islands on one side; and Piano, one of the villages of the island, on the other.

Thankfully, the path down isn’t through the stinky fumaroles.

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The fumaroles in Vulcano: the yellow of the rocks is due to the sulphur – which also makes the air smell like rotten eggs

Practical facts for visiting Vulcano Island

Vulcanello, the Valle dei Mostri and Gran Cratere can all be accessed for free and without a guide, though having one will obviously make the experience more complete with information and tips.

Valle dei Mostri can be reached on an easy 30 minutes walk from Porto di Levante (the largest village, where the hydrofoils to the other islands and to Sicily depart from) and it is well signaled. The path to the caldera of Vulcanello, on the other hand, isn’t as well marked and it may be necessary to ask directions to the access point.

The entry point to the path to Gran Cratere is located at around 10 minutes walk from Porto di Levante. The walk to the crater and back takes no more than 2 hours, though the path is steep and sandy in some points and the length of the walk depends on one’s level of fitness.

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The Gran Cratere of Vulcano

Gearing up for the hike

The hike to Gran Cratere is short and not too demanding, but wearing and carrying the proper gear is always recommended. Here’s a useful list of what to wear and take:

  • Hiking boots: some people wear plain running shoes, others even attempt to hike with walking shoes or flip flops. But keep in mind that the terrain is sandy, rocky and slippery in some points; not to mention the ground near the fumaroles is very hot. Hiking boots provide the much needed ankle support and protect from the heat.
  • T-shirt and either shorts (in the summer months) or hiking pants: also add asweather and a wind proof jacket. The wind is quite chilly at the top.
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A scarf or, even better, a mask is needed if wanting to walk through the fumaroles

  • A scarf, or a bandana: the sulphur at the crater makes the air stink so much that wearing a scarf around the nose and mouth is a must! If possible, wear a mask.
  • A hat: especially if walking in the summer months and in the hottest hours.
  • Sunglasses: it is so dusty that they are necessary to protect the eyes.
  • A daypack: use it to carry the extra layers and a lots of water.
  • A camera: the view is so breathtaking that taking pictures is a must!
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A splendid view of the Aeolian Islands from the top of Gran Cratere in Vulcano

Where to stay and eat in Vulcano

As with the rest of the Aeolian Islands, there are plenty of sleeping and eating options in Vulcano island. I arrived there at the end of 6 weeks of hectic travels, so I felt the need to pamper myself and opted to stay at the marvelous Therasia Resort. Click here for the latest rates and here for reviews.

Aside from a gorgeous, spacious room with views of the sea and the rest of the Aeolian Islands, I enjoyed eating at the two delicious on site restaurants (the breakfast buffet is one the best I have ever seen!); I jumped into the beautiful infinity pool; and I treated myself to the spa where I could pick from a great variety of treatments.

How to get to Vulcano Island

Vulcano can be reached via hydrofoil in a little over one hour from Milazzo, near Messina. From Vulcano, there are regular hydrofoils to the rest of the Aeolian Islands and to Milazzo.

Traveling to Sicily? Make sure to read my posts A Great Guide To The Things To Do In Catania, Italy” and “A Fantastic 8 Days Sicily Itinerary.”

Legal Disclaimer: I was a guest of Imperatore Travel during my time in Vulcano. All the views and opinions expressed are my own and based on my personal experience. The views expressed are honest and factual without any bias.

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Learn how to enjoy Vulcano - via @clautavani

 

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